Napoleonic & ECW wargaming, with a load of old Hooptedoodle on this & that


Tuesday, 30 June 2020

Duke of York's HQ - Military Festival 20th March 1965 - PROGRAMME

Over the last year there has been some discussion here of the celebrated 1965 commemorative Waterloo wargame played at the Duke of York's HQ. If you wish to have a look at that, click here. We've had photos from the Featherstone book, and the report from Wargamer's Newsletter.

Today I am delighted to have a scan of the original programme, very kindly provided by Iain, the famed Albannach, no less - a Nobel Prize nomination will follow forthwith.

Here you will find all sorts - list of the participants, list of trade stands and - wait for it - the rules they used! Have a look - nostalgia lives - 1 dice for each 6 firers...

Anyway - without further ado, here it is. [One small message here - if any Resource Investigator on TMP feels the need to spread this round the world, it would be appreciated if they had the courtesy to say thanks, or at least hello, to acknowledge the hard work and love which goes into keeping these things alive. Iain, I'll be right behind you, mate - no worries - and thanks again!]  










 

19 comments:

  1. What a great find, very interesting to see the list of exhibitors and participants.

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  2. A great piece of wargaming history and another example of the early rules - simple but effective. I'm tempted to try them out. Cheers (Delta Coy)

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  3. Oh, that's brilliant. "When a unit's morale is in question" Love the terminology.

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  4. Absolutely superb. Well done for getting this on line. Derek Guylor as guest of honour!

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  5. Wonderful, thanks for sharing.

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  6. Thanks for sharing that , brilliant piece of nostalgia .

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  7. Fascinating stuff. Looks like Mr Gilder was very busy. The rules are appropriately old school.

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  8. Terrific stuff, thanks for sharing.

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  9. What a find - have you passed this scan and rules on to John Curry at the History of Wargames project for his next Featherstone related title?

    Such overt recruiting for the TA and for wargaming.

    As time machine dates go for wargaming, this for many would be one of them worth visiting?

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  10. Fascinating stuff Tony, I particularly like the simplicity of the morale rules, food for thought. We should try our own re-fight of the re-fight!

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  11. Great stuff, thanks to both you and Iain. Really good that they gave everyone the rules, and 'military festival' sounds so much better than 'games convention'.. It solves the mystery of the players/generals too, though I admit I don't recognise many names - but it was a very long time ago. Interesting that Eric Knowles was Picton, whose last words according to Wikipedia were "Charge! Charge! Hurrah! Hurrah" I wonder if that was Eric's style?

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  12. Gentlemen all - thanks for your enthusiastic comments - any credit for all this is due to Iain, for storing the programme and for taking the trouble to scan it.

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  13. I enjoyed reading this very much. The rules are interesting. I may adapt the morale rules and those for cavalry charging Infantry and use them with the Charge rules I use for my Napoleonic games.

    I wonder if the display stands were just that or where they also selling to the public as they would be today.

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  14. What a great find, map, o.o.b. and rules which will most probably give a good game without any tweaks.
    Just reading about the whole affair rekindles why I got into this great hobby

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  15. How did I miss this? (Perhaps I was with the Prussians?)

    Great stuff!

    (hmm do Waterloo 1793 again but in 40mm? No..... no no no no hmm )

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  16. Foy,
    to use someone elses words: a mythical game...an event gathering the then leading lights of the nascent wargaming world.
    So myths become truth...
    On the other hand, I played in the in situ 2015 Waterloo game...this will also be a myth in 50 years I guess.
    Cheers,
    Pjotr

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