A discursive look at Napoleonic & ECW wargaming, plus a load of old Hooptedoodle on this & that


Monday, 18 September 2017

Steve St Clair and a quarter of a million friends

Someone sent me the link to this video; I hadn't seen it before, though I would guess it is very famous. If you have concerns about the size of your current project, or if you are running out of space for your collection, check this out.


9 comments:

  1. Hmm, yes, no need to stop with just Bavarians then Tony?

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  2. That's what we all need a friend who has more figures than yourself - so our addiction doesn't seem to bad !

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  3. Some small part of me finds this oddly reassuring as I slowly back away, smiling, and nodding my head.

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  4. Well, if the gentleman wants to donate the collection, I would gracious accept!

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  5. Wow! It makes my 12,000 figure collection seem puny. I admire the way he has stuck to one figure scale, one period, one battle. Like most wargamers I have multiple scales of figure from 2mm to 42mm, multiple periods and duplicate armies in more than one scale; and never seem to fully finish any project before I start the next. Clearly as a military man this chap has discipline!!!

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  6. He seems a thoroughly well balanced sort of chap.

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  7. I find the army absolutely fantastic - count the ways. It does make me a little uneasy, though - the most uneasy moment was when he said that his hobby introduced a balance into his life. With the greatest of respect, I find myself wondering nervously what his life would have been like without it.

    Also - what happens if one day he is reading - oh, let's say an Osprey book - and he suddenly realises that every single one of those battalions should have had the colours to the left of the colonel? There's also something else I can't quite put my finger on here, but i have a feeling that the harder you try to get something perfect, the more perfection becomes unobtainable. Since we are getting pretty close to atomic scale here, does the Observer Effect come into play? - i.e. the closer we get to complete perfection, the more likely it becomes that we muck it up (to quote Bell's Theorem) simply by trying to inspect it?

    What? - yes - bollocks - all right, you got me.

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  8. I can't be the only one thinking 'you'll need long arms to reach the middle of that table.'

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