A discursive look at Napoleonic & ECW wargaming, plus a load of old Hooptedoodle on this & that


Friday, 28 October 2011

Things with Wheels

Here are the first two completed vehicles from the current surge of activity.


The ox cart, previously photographed in bits, now complete - S-Range Minifigs with Hinton Hunt driver. I was going to caption this picture Moo!, since my son and I, both being silly, always shout this whenever we see cattle, or even pictures of cattle, but it occurs to me that in this case the noise of the animals would be drowned out by the screech of the wooden axles.


More S-Range, with a driver recruited from the very last of the spare NapoleoN infantry fusiliers. Jean-Marie appears to be wondering how those two little horses can pull that dirty big pontoon cart. Well, they can - so there you have it. And not only that, but his uniform is correct as well (according to my consultancy support team of Ray Roussel, De Vries and Knoetel & Elting). Thank you, chaps.

My next two efforts will be a Portuguese howitzer and limber, pulled by mules (see Alexander Dickson, vol.2, page ........), which should be fun, plus a British caisson. One small piece of bad news for the caisson is that the Lamming draught horses I was going to use seem to be a bit big. Well, maybe they're not strictly too big, but they make all the other horses look small, which is the same thing. Rethink required - by the way, if anyone has spares of the old S-Range or Alberken or Minifig 20mm artillery horses like the ones shown attached to the pontoon, please just let me know - I can use any number of these.

One final discovery today is that my wizard wheeze of putting steel paper on the underside of the bases of the carts and magnetic material on the floor of a box file to hold them firmly does not look promising. The carts are too heavy. I may as well save the expense and not bother with the magnetic sheet. Curses. Back to the laboratory.

1 comment:

  1. Well done, they look well.

    I use magnetic sheet on figure bases in steel paper lined boxes. It seems to work for even rather heavy pieces.

    ReplyDelete

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