A discursive look at Napoleonic & ECW wargaming, plus a load of old Hooptedoodle on this & that


Monday, 26 November 2012

New French General


Here's the figure for Ferey. Yes, all right, this is a bit fancy for an infantry division commander on campaign in Spain - the casting is Art Miniaturen's 'Colbert', and my intention is that eventually (probably) this chap will be a cavalry general in The Cupboard's establishment, but for the purposes of the present campaign let's just assume that Ferey was kind of flashy.

Footnote to the portrait of the bold Claude-Francois in my previous post - this painting was done in Germany in 1809, when Ferey was still a general de brigade. He had been promoted to general de division by the time he was fatally wounded at Salamanca. Here is a macabre but interesting entry from the journal of Major George Simmons of the 95th Rifles', dated 29th July 1812:

To Olmedo, a curious town with the remains of a Moorish castle. Close to the place was interred the body of General Ferey. He was the officer who ordered the night attack at Barba del Puerco in 1810. How extraordinary are the changes produced by war! Only two years before he had 10,000 veteran soldiers under his command. He was then actively employed against us, and now humbled to the dust, and I standing by his grave gazing at his mutilated corpse. The Spaniards had dug him up directly after the French left the town and just before we entered. He had been buried with great honour, and a canopy of laurels, which had been placed over his grave, was torn down, his body exhumed, and his head severed from it. It was a noble head, with a fine expressive countenance and a pair of large moustaches. I could not help observing, "Well, you must have been a brave soldier, although our deadly foe. You shall be replaced by an enemy where your friends interred you, to rest in peace." The remains were then in a most decent manner returned to the grave, and the Spaniards made acquainted with the horror and disgust we felt at their inhuman conduct towards a dead soldier. The laurel was replaced, and we begged it might be allowed to remain, which I have no reason to doubt was complied with.

Anyway, the model depicts General Ferey in his glory, before Salamanca and, apparently, the moustaches, checking that his men are in fact following on as directed. He was 41 at the time of his death.

9 comments:

  1. A dashing figure with a great paint job Tony.

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    1. Thanks Lee - notice the new Pelikan white paint in action!

      In passing, I got an email from Martin suggesting that the horse has obviously got into trouble with chewing gum - it took me a while, but I see what he means. I might snip that off - I usually try to leave these bits for strength...

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  2. What a big plume and a leopard skin shabraque and suddenly they are saying "flashy"? A fine looking general. Probably inpires the men. Speaking of which I regret to inform you that the latest wave of blogger madness has washed over me and I have nominated you as one of my favorite or Liebster Blogs (I don't speak German so am taking this on faith) (see
    my post for more )

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    1. Thank you very much for the nomination Ross - I think!

      I think Ferey's men might feel better about his leopard skin forse furniture if they themselves had boots. Don't know if you noticed, but the portrait of Ferey in the previous post features his favourite greyhound - don't know if that implies he had more than one.

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  3. A great looking figure, love the saddle cloth!

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    1. Polyester, dear boy - polyester. No animals were hurt in the preparation of this figure. Apart from the horses we boiled down for the baseboard glue.

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  4. That's a lovely paint job Tony - leopard skins are almost as hard to do as tiger skins!

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    1. Agreed! Plain crimson shabraques in future.

      Thanks Ian - Cheers - Tony

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  5. beautiful, I love the general, the horse and the building too.

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